Monday, November 9, 2009

Hypercholesterolemia

Hypercholesterolemia cholesterol is what nutritionists call the "fat", said the scientific to explain fat and fat. Cholesterol is found in foods (meat fat, butter, fried, etc..) And the body produces too. In fact, cholesterol is present in all cells of the human body and is very useful for the growth, hormone production, manufacture vitamin D, and even digestion. This is not the enemy!

However, there are "good" cholesterol (HDL) and bad cholesterol (LDL). One of HDL's role is to cleanse the body of excess LDL. Indeed, the good cholesterol arteries clean and absorb bad fats, by reducing or removing the liver to recycle (by salt bile removed by the intestine).
Indeed, if the good HDL cholesterol can not get rid of bad LDL cholesterol excesses, gradually settles in the arteries. Over time, these deposits eventually form a plaque, clogging arteries and thus confusing the blood circulation. Because the blood is prevented to reach the heart, heart attack (or myocardial infarction) can occur. If the arteries that go to the brain is blocked, there is danger of a stroke (brain-vascular accident).

High cholesterol or hyperlipidemia is not the disease itself. Rather it is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. There are no symptoms attached to this issue. To find out if you have high cholesterol, you must have a blood test. This is the only way.
Now evident that there is a direct relationship between high cholesterol (or hyperlipemia, which is too high bad cholesterol levels) and the risk of heart disease, the leading cause of death in industrialized countries.

1 comments:

shashank said...

Here is a link to more information about the genetics of Hypercholesterolemia that was prepared by our genetic counselor and which has links to some useful resource for those dealing with this condition: http://www.accessdna.com/condition/Hypercholesterolemia/192. There is also a number listed for anyone who wants to speak to a genetic counselor by phone. I hope it helps. Thanks, AccessDNA

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